EM3 Survey Methods

In the initial stages of the project we are encouraging volunteers to simply survey bats around their home or anywhere that they would like to know more about what bats are present within the North Pennine AONB. We suggest you select footpaths around your home or somewhere you are familiar with and walk at a gentle walking pace along these footpaths on the nights you select.

As the project develops we hope to undertake more detailed surveying at selected sites with repeated surveying of defined transects and targeted surveys to investigate the distribution of certain species depending on initial results.

 

A short transect walked in Eastgate, Weardale. Each dot represents a bat pass (blue - Common pipistrelle, purple - Soprano pipistrelle, Red - Myotis sp.)

A short transect walked in Eastgate, Weardale. Each dot represents a bat pass (blue – Common pipistrelle, purple – Soprano pipistrelle, Red – Myotis sp.)

 

Survey Conditions

To maximise your chances of recording bats please only survey when conditions are suitable, few bats will be active in windy and wet conditions and in low temperatures.

In addition the EM3 are not very weatherproof so please don’t risk the bat detector getting wet whilst you are out.

Different bat species tend to emerge from their roosts at different times after sunset, to increase the likelihood of you recording all the species present in your survey area we suggest that you don’t start surveying until about 30-40mins after sunset.

If whilst surveying you observe bats entering or leaving what you suspect is a roost site you should in no circumstances investigate the potential roost. Bats are afforded a high level of protection (EC Habitats Directive and in UK legislation by The Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2010 and by the Wildlife and Countryside Act -1981) and it is illegal to disturb the roost of bats and you would be committing an offense.